Making every minute count with the Malteser Medical Transport Service

Samuel Schuler can’t risk his phone breaking. As one of the heads of the Malteser Medical Transport Service (MMTS) in Munich, the moment a mission comes to his team it’s a race against the clock for them to complete it. And when it’s all stations are go, accidents can happen. “That’s why we’ve opted for these phones,” he says. “If I drop my phone during a hectic mission it doesn’t break. I just pick it up again like nothing happened.”

 

Run by around 40 volunteers, the MMTS travels far and wide, including other German cities and even other countries. With an ever-changing roster of people and places, hygiene is paramount: “T

he Cat phones are washable and easy to clean. That is very important, especially when the helpers take turns using a phone. Now, our mobile phones have to be disinfected almost every day and any other phone wouldn’t stand up to that.”

“If I drop my phone during a hectic mission it doesn’t break. I just pick it up again like nothing happened”

Malteser, a non-government organization, is the only provider of medical transport in the greater Munich area. That means, if a clinic needs a heart and lung machine in the middle of the night, they don’t call a neighbouring clinic and ask them to send it over. Instead, hospital staff dial 112 and are put through to a local Malteser coordination centre. An alert is then put out to all the local volunteers, which happens in three ways; a special rad

io receiver goes off, the volunteer gets a call on their mobile phone and their emergency responders app fires up, with details of the mission appearing on their screen.

 

Rugged, durable devices have long been used by the MMTS. But until they switched to their new fleet of Cat S42s and Cat S62 Pros, they weren’t smartphones. Now, the phones have been integrated into every step of their alert system. From receiving the initial alert to sending over the final bits of documentation ­, their phones are both physically durable and technologically advanced. “The Cat phones offer us all the functionality we need in a smartphone,” says Samuel. “Now, the service goes even smoother than before.”

“Many of our staff now want to switch to a Cat phone in their private lives too.”

With an average of 70 trips a month, the MMTS volunteers never know what’s around the corner. One day, they could be rushing blood samples off to be tested, the other, it’s transporting organs for transplantation, so they need to be as prepared as they can. “Using the smartphone app saves a lot of effort and even improves its quality,” he explains. “Many of our staff now want to switch to a Cat phone in their private lives too.”